Thank you, healthcare workers, for all you do. Your determination to help others is truly inspiring. Please stay safe.
Med-IQ
Inadequate Response to RA Therapy: What Your Patients Want You to Know

Inadequate Response to RA Therapy: What Your Patients Want You to Know

E-Publication
Online Course | Specialties: Rheumatology
Released: 12/22/2020
|
Expires: 12/21/2021
|
Max Credits: 0.5
Jump to Education

Faculty
Elena Myasoedova, MD, PhD
Associate Professor of Medicine
Senior Associate Consultant
Rheumatology
Mayo Clinic
Rochester, MN

Jasvinder Singh, MD, MPH
Professor of Medicine and Epidemiology
Division of Rheumatology and Immunology
Department of Medicine
The University of Alabama at Birmingham
Director, Gout Clinic
The University of Alabama Health Sciences Foundation
Birmingham, AL

Activity Planners
Stephanie Larson, PhD
Clinical Content Manager
Med-IQ
Baltimore, MD

Rebecca L. Julian, MS, ELS
Senior Manager, Editorial
Med-IQ
Baltimore, MD

Samantha Gordon, MS
Accreditation Manager
Med-IQ
Baltimore, MD

Amy Sison
Director of CME
Med-IQ
Baltimore, MD

Writer
Ron Schaumburg
Wynnewood, PA

Learning Objectives
Upon completion, participants should be able to:

  • Describe how inadequate treatment response to targeted immunomodulators negatively affects morbidity, mortality, and quality of life in patients with RA
  • Incorporate patient preferences and priorities into individualized RA treatment plans
  • Identify the role of educational interventions in supporting medication adherence in patients with RA

Target Audience
This activity is intended for rheumatologists and rheumatology nurse practitioners, physician assistants, and nurses.

Statement of Need
Many patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) do not receive effective treatment or achieve an adequate response with standard therapies. Inadequately treated RA is associated with significant inflammation and progressive joint damage, resulting in disability, decreased quality of life, and increased mortality. Supporting patients with RA in their treatment goals includes recognizing the effect that inadequate treatment has on quality of life, incorporating patient preferences and priorities into treatment plans, and integrating comprehensive educational initiatives that promote patient adherence.

Accreditation/Designation Statements
Med-IQ is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Med-IQ designates this enduring material for a maximum of 0.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Nurse practitioners, physician assistants, and other healthcare professionals who successfully complete the activity will receive a Statement of Participation indicating the maximum credits available.

Medium/Method of Participation
This CME activity consists of a 0.5-credit online publication. To receive credit, read the introductory CME material, read the publication, and complete the post-survey, evaluation, attestation, and post-test, answering at least 70% of the post-test questions correctly.

Initial Release Date: December 22, 2020
Expiration Date: December 21, 2021
Estimated Time to Complete This Activity: 30 minutes

Disclosure Policy
Med-IQ requires any person in a position to control the content of an educational activity to disclose all relevant financial relationships with any commercial interest. The ACCME defines "relevant financial relationships" as those in any amount occurring within the past 12 months, including those of a spouse/life partner, that could create a conflict of interest (COI). Individuals who refuse to disclose will not be permitted to contribute to this CME activity in any way. Med-IQ has policies in place that will identify and resolve COIs prior to this educational activity. Med-IQ also requires faculty to disclose discussions of investigational products or unlabeled/unapproved uses of drugs or devices regulated by the US Food and Drug Administration.

Drug/Product Usage by Faculty
Off-label/unapproved drug uses or products are mentioned within this activity.

Disclosure Statement
The content of this activity has been peer reviewed and has been approved for compliance. The faculty and contributors have indicated the following financial relationships, which have been resolved through an established COI resolution process, and have stated that these reported relationships will not have any impact on their ability to give an unbiased presentation.

Elena Myasoedova, MD, PhD, has indicated no real or apparent conflicts.

Jasvinder Singh, MD, MPH
Consulting fees/advisory boards: Clearview Healthcare Partners, Clinical Care Options, Crealta/Horizon, Fidia Pharma USA Inc., Focus Forward, Medisys, Navigant Consulting, Putnam Associates, Spherix Global Insights, Trio Health, UBM LLC
Ownership interest (stocks/stock options – excluding mutual funds): Amarin, Charlotte’s Web Holdings, Inc., Moderna, Inc., Vaxart, Inc., Viking Therapeutics

Ron Schaumburg has indicated no real or apparent conflicts.

The peer reviewers and activity planners have no financial relationships to disclose.

Statement of Evidence-Based Content
Educational activities that assist physicians in carrying out their professional responsibilities more effectively and efficiently are consistent with the ACCME definition of continuing medical education (CME). As an ACCME-accredited provider of CME, it is the policy of Med-IQ to review and ensure that all the content and any recommendations, treatments, and manners of practicing medicine in CME activities are scientifically based, valid, and relevant to the practice of medicine. Med-IQ is responsible for validating the content of the CME activities it provides. Specifically, (1) all recommendations addressing the medical care of patients must be based on evidence that is scientifically sound and recognized as such within the profession; (2) all scientific research referred to, reported, or used in CME in support or justification of a patient care recommendation must conform to generally accepted standards of experimental design, data collection, and analysis.

Med-IQ is not liable for any decision made or action taken in reliance upon the information provided through this activity.

Contact Information
For CME/CE questions or comments about this activity, please contact Med-IQ. Call (toll-free) 866 858 7434 or email info@med-iq.com.

System Requirements

Desktop

Mobile

  • Operating system - Med-IQ supports the current operating system, plus two prior releases:
    • Android (eg, Samsung Galaxy)
    • Apple (eg, iPhone/iPad)
  • Browsers - Med-IQ supports the default browser for the applicable operating system release, plus two prior releases:
    • Android (Chrome)
    • Apple (Safari)

Applications & Software

For technical assistance, please refer to our Support Manual.

Disclaimer
The information provided through this activity is for continuing education purposes only and is not meant to substitute for the independent medical judgment of a physician relative to diagnostic and treatment options of a specific patient’s medical condition.

Privacy & Confidentiality
Med-IQ is committed to honoring your privacy and protecting any personal information you choose to share with us. For detailed information about our privacy policy, please visit: www.med-iq.com/privacy-policy.html.

Acknowledgment of Commercial Support
This activity is supported by an educational grant from Gilead Sciences, Inc.

Copyright
© 2020 Med-IQ, Inc.

Abstract

Here are some key takeaways from this activity. Deeper insights and evidence, plus an opportunity to receive credit, are available by clicking the "Continue" button below.

Many patients with RA do not receive effective treatment or achieve an adequate response with standard therapies. Inadequately treated RA is associated with significant inflammation and progressive joint damage, resulting in disability, decreased quality of life, and increased mortality. Supporting patients with RA in their treatment goals includes recognizing the effect that inadequate treatment has on quality of life, incorporating patient preferences and priorities into treatment plans, and integrating comprehensive educational initiatives that promote treatment adherence.

Case study 1:

  • Most patients start RA treatment with MTX, but up to 60% to 70% of patients respond inadequately and require therapy intensification and/or discontinuation of MTX
  • TNFis are the most widely used biologics in the treatment of RA, but 30% to 40% of patients receiving TNFis do not achieve a sustained response

Case study 2:

  • Integrating patient preferences into therapeutic plans promotes treatment adherence and achieves optimal outcomes
  • Patient considerations in RA treatment planning include the route of administration, cost, and effectiveness of the medication, as well as the risk of adverse events
  • Although data do not suggest that patients with RA who are immunosuppressed have a higher risk of COVID-19 infection, the fear of infection because of having a suppressed immune system may influence patient willingness to initiate biologic therapy

Case study 3:

  • Interventions to optimize treatment adherence should concentrate on patient concerns rather than the need for medication
  • Barriers to adherence include a belief that medication is unnecessary or ineffective, stigma associated with having a chronic illness, concern about adverse events, and medication cost
  • Although education is an important part of any clinical intervention, evidence suggests it should be supplemented with additional approaches to best support patient adherence

View reference list.

Click "Continue" to proceed through this activity and/or receive credit. To receive credit and a certificate, you must complete all of the chapters in this activity.

By clicking "Continue," you confirm that you have reviewed the CME information.
Continue
Unless otherwise indicated, photographed subjects who appear within the content of this activity or on artwork associated with this activity are models; they are not actual patients or doctors.