Med-IQ
Improving the Diagnosis and Treatment of Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Lung Disease

Improving the Diagnosis and Treatment of Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Lung Disease

An estimated 50,000 to 90,000 people in the United States have nontuberculous mycobacterial lung disease (NTM-LD), leading to decreased quality of life and impaired daily functioning. Diagnosing NTM-LD can be challenging because the symptoms are nonspecific and include chronic cough, increased sputum production, dyspnea, fever, malaise, and weight loss. Patients are also likely to be under- or overtreated due to a previous lack of clear guidance. This educational series includes 2 activities. The first is an educational program featuring faculty Charles L. Daley, MD, and Shannon Kasperbauer, MD, in an engaging video presentation discussing the diagnostic criteria and treatment recommendations for NTM-LD based on the 2020 ATS/ERS/ESCMID/IDSA clinical practice guideline. In the second activity, practice what you learned by reviewing the case of a patient who presents with symptoms of NTM-LD; this activity also includes insights and video clips from Elisa Ignatius, MD, MSc, Doreen Addrizzo-Harris, MD, on appropriate management of patients presenting with NTM-LD.

Faculty

Charles L. Daley, MD
Chief, Division of Mycobacterial and Respiratory Infections
National Jewish Health
Denver, CO

Shannon Kasperbauer, MD
Division of Mycobacterial and Respiratory Infections
National Jewish Health
Denver, CO

Doreen J. Addrizzo-Harris, MD
Professor, Department of Medicine
NYU Grossman School of Medicine
Associate Director, Education and Faculty Affairs, Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine
Director, Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine Fellowship
Co-Director, NYU Bronchiectasis and NTM Center
NYU Langone Health
New York, NY

Ashwin Basavaraj, MD, FCC
Assistant Professor, Department of Medicine
NYU Grossman School of Medicine
Section Chief, Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine
Bellevue Hospital Center
NYU Langone Health
New York, NY

Elisa Ignatius, MD, MSc
Assistant Professor of Medicine
Divisions of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Pharmacology
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
Baltimore, MD