Med-IQ
Strengthening Short Bowel Syndrome Care: Strategies for Comprehensive, Multidisciplinary Management

Strengthening Short Bowel Syndrome Care: Strategies for Comprehensive, Multidisciplinary Management

Med-IQ Select

Developed in collaboration
Med-IQ      BU

Released: 12/6/2021
|
Expires: 12/5/2022
|
Max Credits: 1.0
Jump to Education

Faculty
Dong Wook Kim, MD
Assistant Professor of Medicine
Boston University School of Medicine
Boston, MA

Tram T. Tran, NP
Nurse Practitioner
Boston Medical Center
Boston, MA

Lorraine S. Young, MS, RD, LDN
Instructor of Medicine
Boston University School of Medicine
Boston, MA

Activity Planners
Jaime Symowicz, PhD
Manager, Educational Strategy and Content
Med-IQ
Baltimore, MD

Laura Rafferty, ELS
Senior Editorial Manager
Med-IQ
Baltimore, MD

Samantha Gordon, MS
Accreditation Manager
Med-IQ
Baltimore, MD

Julie White, MS, CHCP
Director, Continuing Medical Education
Boston University School of Medicine
Boston, MA

Ilana Hardesty
Assistant Director, CME Operations
Barry M. Manuel CME Office
Boston University School of Medicine
Boston, MA

Writer
Stephanie Wenick, MPhil
Wenick Communications, LLC
Chevy Chase, MD

Learning Objectives
Upon completion, participants should be able to:

  • Integrate available management strategies that promote intestinal absorption into management plans for patients with SBS
  • Apply best practice recommendations to provide comprehensive SBS management
  • Summarize the benefits of providing coordinated, multidisciplinary, and multiprofessional care for patients with SBS
Target Audience
This activity is intended for gastroenterologists, surgeons, social workers, dietitians, pharmacists, nurses, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, pediatricians, internists, psychologists, and feeding therapists.

Statement of Need
Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is a rare malabsorptive condition that was previously fatal before the development of parenteral nutrition (PN). However, PN is associated with life-threatening complications, and patients eventually need to be weaned from it, which often requires enteral nutrition, specialized dietary modifications, anti-secretory agents, anti-motility agents, antibiotics, glucagon-like peptide 2 analogue treatment, and/or surgical procedures. Due to the complexity of this disorder, individuals with SBS should receive comprehensive, multidisciplinary care, preferably within an established intestinal care center, but not all patients live near centers that can provide this type of specialized management. For these reasons, healthcare providers who care for patients with SBS need to be familiar with different management strategies and the importance of coordinating care with a multidisciplinary and multiprofessional care team.

Collaboration Statement
This activity was developed by Med-IQ in collaboration with the Boston University School of Medicine.

Accreditation/Designation Statements
Boston University School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Boston University School of Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Boston University School of Medicine Continuing Nursing Education is accredited with distinction as a provider of nursing continuing professional development by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation.

Contact Hours: 1.0

Other healthcare professionals who successfully complete the activity will receive a Statement of Participation indicating the maximum credits available.

Medium/Method of Participation
This is a 1.0-credit CME/CNE activity. To receive credit, read the introductory CME/CNE material, complete all of the modules, and complete the evaluation, attestation, and post-test, answering at least 70% of the post-test questions correctly.

Initial Release Date: December 6, 2021
Expiration Date: December 5, 2022
Estimated Time to Complete This Activity: 1 hour

Disclosure Policy
Boston University School of Medicine asks all individuals involved in the development and presentation of Accredited Continuing Education activities to disclose all financial relationships with ineligible companies. This information is disclosed to all activity participants prior to the start of the educational activity. Boston University School of Medicine has procedures to mitigate all relevant financial relationships with ineligible companies. In addition, faculty members are asked to disclose when any unapproved use of pharmaceuticals and devices is being discussed.

Disclosure Statement
In accordance with the Standards for Integrity and Independence in Accredited Continuing Education, all relevant financial relationships with ineligible companies that faculty, planners, authors and anyone who may be in control of content have been mitigated.

Dong Wook Kim, MD
Consulting: Sebela Pharmaceuticals

Tram T. Tran, NP, has indicated no real or apparent conflicts.

Lorraine S. Young, MS, RD, LDN, has indicated no real or apparent conflicts.

The writer, peer reviewers, and activity planners have no financial relationships to disclose.

Statement of Evidence-Based Content
Educational activities that assist physicians in carrying out their professional responsibilities more effectively and efficiently are consistent with the ACCME definition of continuing medical education (CME). As an ACCME-accredited provider of CME, it is the policy of Med-IQ to review and ensure that all the content and any recommendations, treatments, and manners of practicing medicine in CME activities are scientifically based, valid, and relevant to the practice of medicine. Med-IQ is responsible for validating the content of the CME activities it provides. Specifically, (1) all recommendations addressing the medical care of patients must be based on evidence that is scientifically sound and recognized as such within the profession; (2) all scientific research referred to, reported, or used in CME in support or justification of a patient care recommendation must conform to generally accepted standards of experimental design, data collection, and analysis.

Med-IQ is not liable for any decision made or action taken in reliance upon the information provided through this activity.

Contact Information
For CME/CNE questions or comments about this activity, please contact Boston University School of Medicine. Call 617 358 5005 or email cme@bu.edu.

For other questions or comments about this activity, please contact Med-IQ. Call (toll-free) 866 858 7434 or email info@med-iq.com.

System Requirements

Desktop

Mobile

  • Operating system - Med-IQ supports the current operating system, plus two prior releases:
    • Android (eg, Samsung Galaxy)
    • Apple (eg, iPhone/iPad)
  • Browsers - Med-IQ supports the default browser for the applicable operating system release, plus two prior releases:
    • Android (Chrome)
    • Apple (Safari)

Applications & Software

For technical assistance, please refer to our Support Manual.

Disclaimer
THIS CONTINUING MEDICAL EDUCATION PROGRAM IS INTENDED SOLELY FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES FOR QUALIFIED HEALTH CARE PROFESSIONALS. IN NO EVENT SHALL BOSTON UNIVERSITY BE LIABLE FOR ANY DECISION MADE OR ACTION TAKEN IN RELIANCE ON THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THE PROGRAM. IN NO EVENT SHOULD THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THE PROGRAM BE USED AS A SUBSTITUTE FOR PROFESSIONAL CARE. NO PHYSICIAN-PATIENT RELATIONSHIP IS BEING ESTABLISHED. IN NO EVENT SHOULD INFORMATION IN THE MATERIALS REGARDING LAWS, REGULATIONS, OR LEGAL LIABILITY BE CONSIDERED LEGAL ADVICE OR USED AS A SUBSTITUTE FOR CONSULTING WITH AN ATTORNEY.

Complimentary CME/CNE
This activity is available free of charge to participants.

Acknowledgment of Commercial Support
This activity is supported by an educational grant from Takeda Pharmaceuticals U.S.A., Inc.

Copyright
Copyrighted

Abstract
Here are the key takeaways from this activity. Deeper insights and evidence, plus an opportunity to receive credit, are available at the "Continue" button below.
  • Short bowel syndrome is a rare malabsorptive condition that was previously fatal before the development of parenteral nutrition
  • Parenteral nutrition is associated with life-threating complications, requiring eventual weaning
  • To increase intestinal absorption and facilitate independence from parenteral nutrition, patients with short bowel syndrome are often managed with enteral nutrition, specialized dietary modifications, symptomatic treatments (eg, gastric acid secretion reduction therapies, anti-diarrheal agents, antibiotics, somatostatin analogue, bile acid sequestrants), potential curative treatments (ie, GLP-2 analogue treatment), and/or surgical procedures
  • Due to the complexity of short bowel syndrome, a coordinated, multidisciplinary approach to care is recommended, which confers improved patient outcomes and survival
View reference list.

Click "Continue" to proceed through this activity and/or receive credit.

By clicking "Continue," you confirm that you have reviewed the CME information.

Continue

Unless otherwise indicated, photographed subjects who appear within the content of this activity or on artwork associated with this activity are models; they are not actual patients or doctors.

The information provided through this activity is for continuing education purposes only and is not meant to substitute for the independent medical judgment of a physician relative to diagnostic and treatment options of a specific patient’s medical condition.

COPYRIGHTED. Republication or redistribution of Med‑IQ content, including by framing, is prohibited without prior written consent. Med‑IQ shall not be liable for any errors or delays in the content, or for any actions taken in reliance thereon.